“She’s what I want to be…”

The Cardboard Kingdom by Chad Sell and various writers. Alfred A. Knopf, 2018. 9781524719371.

This is the most fun, colorful, entertaining, and sweet-natured graphic novel on diversity and inclusivity that’s ever been. It belongs in your library unless you’re worried great kids comics will distract them from reading “real books.”

A neighborhood full of kids uses imagination to immerse themselves in a world full of magic and super powers where they can be whoever they like. When the young boy who likes to dress as The Sorceress falls into a pool, ruining his outfit, his sister (who wears long Loki horns) makes him a new crown. Their neighbor doesn’t want to play until she makes herself armor and a sword. There’s the beast next door and his sister, The Huntress, and the Hulk-like green banshee whose grandma thinks she should behave and be quiet (her mom supports her inner monster). I want to go on and on but this shouldn’t just be a list. The kids are awesome. My favorite was the boy who dressed as The Blob in a rock-like costume (with streamers) — he’s dispirited when no one can figure out what he’s supposed to be, but then the other kids help turn him into his inner fanged menace. A close second for me is Professor Everything, a bit of a know-it-all who uses advice from books to try to make friends after alienating everyone. (It doesn’t work out until he meets the kingdom’s Scribe, who is totally into comics.)

I ranted about this during my graphic novel presentation at the SWAN conference in Illinois. I hope you were there.

Advertisements

Death and Catses

The Family Trade written by Justin Jordon & Nikki Ryan, art by Morgan Beem. Image, 2018. 9781534305113. 144pp. Contains issues #1 – #5 of the comic book. Publisher’s Rating T / Teen

In the Atlantic Ocean there’s an artificial island called The Float, aka the Free Republic of Thessalia, a center for commerce and democracy in a world like ours but with a little more magic. Jenn Wynn’s family has always secretly done whatever was needed to keep the Float above water, including stealing and killing. At the start of the story she’s out to assassinate a corrupt politician out to seize power for himself by getting people to believe his half truths. Things don’t go well, but she’ll try again. Luckily she can pretend to be a sweet, innocent girl if needed, and she’s also got an army of “talking” cats on her side.

Beem’s illustrations are really fun, and her watercolors bring my favorite of Richard Scala’s color comics to my mind. You can see some of Beem’s comics and illustrations here

The Better To Eat You With, Ma Dear.

Scales & Scoundrels Volume 1: Into The Dragon’s Maw by Sebastian Girner and Galaad. Image, 2018. 9781534304826. Originally published in Scales & Scoundrels #1-#5. Publisher’s Rating: Rated E / Everyone.

This lighthearted, all-ages fantasy graphic novel reminded me of the fun moments in Scott Chantler’s Three Thieves series and the humor in Eric Colossal’s Rutabaga the Adventure Chef books. Galaad’s art and his bright colors in particular add to the tone. And it pretty much had to be fun — Girner also wrote the epic Shirtless Bear Fighter last year, which is the funniest bit of superhero(ish) nonsense I’ve read in a long time. (Bears are attacking civilization and the world needs a hero who’s got both an amazing backstory and a bearskin-covered jet (and whose junk is pixelated when he’s also pantsless, so the book is safe for kids to read). Had me in tears.)

Scales & Scoundrels starts out when a treasure hunter named Luvander is in trouble for cheating at cards. Her escape hints that she may be an urden (dragon). Then she helps out three folks who become her traveling companions: a prince, his shadow, and their dwarven guide. Soon they’re all heading underground into the Dened Lewen in search of treasure. What they find there is stranger and freakier than they expect (and is fodder for a lot more great art).

“O, wonder! How many goodly creatures are there here!”

Phoebe and Her Unicorn in The Magic Storm by Dana Simpson. Amp Comics for Kids, 2017. 9781449483593. 157pp.

The backstory: Phoebe helped a unicorn, Marigold, stop looking at her reflection in a pond. Marigold granted her a wish. Phoebe wished that they’d be best friends, and they have been ever since.

Now disturbing magical forces are at work, and there’s extreme weather on the way. Her less than friendly rival (bully?) Dakota, Queen of the Goblins (or something), is a bit nasty to her at school. (They carry her to school on a litter while Phoebe rides Dakota.) But that’s balanced out by Phoebe’s friendship with Max, who loves science. Phoebe and Marigold will need both of them to deal with whatever is taking both heat and magic from the town.

The marketing blurb I received with my review copy says that it’s about discovering the importance of teamwork (and it is). But it’s also some of the most skillful, fun cartooning I’ve seen in a long time. Plus there’s some nice metallic foil on the cover that gives the title and the lightning bolt glow a shiny glow in the right light.

This is the first full-length Phoebe and Her Unicorn graphic novel.  If these look familiar, it’s probably because there have been five books so far that collect the comic strips.

Ether/Or

Ether: Death Of The Last Golden Blaze by Matt Kindt and David Rubin. Dark Horse, 2017. 9781506701745. Contains Ether #1 – #5.

Boone Dias, a scientist, is addicted to traveling to the magical realm of the Ether. He’s researching how the supernatural works, trying to explain it all in scientific terms. But on this trip, the capital city’s mayor needs his help. Someone has murdered The Blaze, sworn protector of The Ether, inside a locked room. (She was the city’s strong, magic sword wielding superhero.) Boone is pretty sure Lord Ubel (an evil librarian!) is behind it, but proving that is going to be difficult. And along the way he and the realm’s gatekeeper, Glum, are going to have to face a copper golem that threatens not only the Ether but our world as well.

It’s a great start to a series that threatens to have both emotional depth (via Boone’s relationship with his estranged family) and a whole lot of magical weirdness. The weirdest thing about it? To travel between worlds, Boone has to hang himself and get kicked in the butt by an ape. The coolest thing? The colors. Rubin is an amazing artist, but somehow he’s an even better colorist. (Check out both volumes of his The Hero if you like his art as much as I do.)

Go, Gherkin. Go!

Cucumber Quest #1: The Doughnut Kingdom by Gigi D.G. First Second, 2017. 9781626728325. 189pp.

You know that kind of cartoon art I don’t have a name for? The one which features drawings that don’t have any inks at their base, they’re just layers of paint (or digital color) instead, and they just look really soft. This books is that style, and it’s cheery and fun.

Cucumber is a young rabbit getting ready to move to Puffington’s Academy for the Magically Gifted (and/or Incredibly Wealthy). But the Doughnut Kingdom’s Caketown Castle has been seized by the evil Queen Cordelia. Cucumber’s dad wants him to forget school and put an end to whatever she’s doing. The Dream Oracle shows up to put him on the right track. But Cucumber isn’t much of a hero. Luckily his little sister, Almond, is.

There are magic items, monsters that aren’t too monstrous, and lots of color. I’d give it to any kid looking for something to read, and I can’t wait for the second book, which comes out next year. But if you can’t wait, or want to read it now, the whole things still seems to be available here.

Ring My Bell

Injection Volume One by Warren Ellis, drawn by Declan Shalvey. Image, 2015. 9781632154798. Contains Injection #1 – #5. Publisher’s Rating: M / Mature.

Sarah: The pitch for Injection. (Although you sorta don’t find out ’till halfway through the book what the premise is…)
Gene: I know! But you have to have the pitch.
S: I would make someone promise: you have to read the book if I tell them why, but then they have to forget before they read the book. So: wait six months after reading this…
G: Or, like me, put it on hold at the library and then fail to remember why.
S: So a small group of people from different backgrounds in government and computing and folklore and magic get together and ask, what is the path of the future? What’s going to happen next? And what they see is a flatline. After all of this huge technological and cultural change, we’re going to go into this big lull. They try to find out how to change the world so that that doesn’t happen. And they come up with this awesome horrible idea, to combine artificial intelligence with magic with computer learning…
G: They animate an AI but they use magic, and then they release it into the internet.
S: And all of a sudden, things are happening!
G: And it turns out it can warp reality.
S: Oops. They call it the Injection. And not many people outside these folks know what’s going on.
G: Whatever it does looks like magic. Continue reading “Ring My Bell”